ICS Lecture: Dr. Peter Hulme’s “Tropical Town—Caribbean Writers in New York in the Early Twentieth Century”

peterLAs part of its Conferencias Caribeñas 14 lecture series, the Institute of Caribbean Studies of the University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras (UPR-RP), invites the academic community and the general public to the lecture “Tropical Town: Caribbean Writers in New York in the Early Twentieth Century” by Dr. Peter Hulme (Department of Literature, Film and Theater Studies, University of Essex, UK). Dr. Peter L. Carlo Becerra (Department of Sociology and Anthropology, School of Social Sciences, UPR-RP), will comment the lecture.

This activity will take place on Thursday, January 30, from 1:00 to 3:30pm at the Manuel Maldonado Denis Amphitheatre (CRA 108) of the Carmen Rivera de Alvarado Building, School of Social Sciences, UPR-RP.

Description: New York has had a Caribbean dimension from its very earliest years, a dimension boosted in the twentieth century by massive immigration and by movement back and forth, all of which has had literary consequences. My particular interests in the project outlined in this paper are threefold: to look more closely at the early part of the twentieth century, which has been less studied; to pay particular attention to the interaction between writers from different islands; and to study the engagement of Hispanic writers with US writers through the short-lived but influential Pan-American literary movement.

This lecture will be broadcast LIVE online through the following website: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/cc71

Comments and suggestions on this presentation will be welcome at: iec@uprrp.edu

For further information, you may call Dr. Humberto García Muñiz, Director, at (787) 764-0000, extension 4212, or write to iec@uprrp.edu

Also see the Institute of Caribbean Studies on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#%21/pages/Instituto-de-Estudios-del-Caribe-UPR/146169468754542?ref=sgm

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