The New Age of Bronze, Fredric Snitzer Gallery

Teo Freytes (MSA Xperimental) shares information about “The New Age of Bronze,” on view at the Fredric Snitzer Gallery until August 21, 2021. The exhibition focuses on contemporary approaches and surveys various methodologies and perspectives specific to each of the featured artists: José Bedia, Tomás Esson, Yusimy Lara, Jon Pylypchuk, and Alan Sonfist. Here are excerpts; for more information and a video of the exhibition, see MSA X.

For Tomás Esson the Talisman symbolizes not only the relationship with his father, who introduced him to the concept of a “resguardo” or personal protective amulet but also signifies many transformations in his life. It is a symbol modeled from paste and late baked to harden, something the artist traditionally always carries in his pockets. He often gives versions to his family members and to special people he meets, giving away hundreds of talisman sculptures. Esson’s Ode to Talisman is an enlarged bronze version of this “resguardo,” a marker to his artistic legacy.

Jose Bedia’s neo-primitivist style is a unique synthesis of the artistic traditions of tribal cultures in Africa and those crafts indigenous to the Americas. Known for his large-scale paintings, his works frequently depict mythical elements, altars, and other sacramental imagery. Nkuyu Wele Konda Nsese (Trickster Hunting an Antelope) is an installation that plays between the physical and non-physical. The trickster, an immaterial being in many cultures, is presented as a bronze sculpture “catching” an intangible painted antelope made of traditional tukula powder. In the painting are other physical elements that protrude such as arrows, real animal legs, and a rope, a metaphorical umbilical cord between the figure and his alter ego. Using Congo myth, Bedia transforms the metaphysical into solid and tangible while creating a seamless translation of the artist’s oeuvre into bronze. [. . .]

For Tomás Esson the Talisman symbolizes not only the relationship with his father, who introduced him to the concept of a “resguardo” or personal protective amulet but also signifies many transformations in his life. It is a symbol modeled from paste and late baked to harden, something the artist traditionally always carries in his pockets. He often gives versions to his family members and to special people he meets, giving away hundreds of talisman sculptures. Esson’s Ode to Talisman is an enlarged bronze version of this “resguardo,” a marker to his artistic legacy.

Yusimy Lara is a Miami-based artist born in Havana, Cuba. Her artistic practices explore subjects related to natural phenomena, specifically its connection to humanity and all that is living. Using a combination of natural and manmade materials, Lara references synergistic interactions between living organisms and their environment. Often her sculptures reference environmental processes occurring over time, addressing erosion, decomposition, and sedimentation. Her amorphous constructions are commentaries on the way life has transformed our planet and how humanity has shaped the transfiguration of the natural world. [. . .]

See more information and video at https://msa-x-2.msa-x.org/2021/07/06/the-new-age-of-bronze-at-fredric-snitzer-gallery/

Also see https://www.snitzer.com/the-new-age-of-bronze

Teo Freytes (MSA Xperimental) shares information about “The New Age of Bronze,” on view at the Fredric Snitzer Gallery until August 21, 2021. The exhibition focuses on contemporary approaches and surveys various methodologies and perspectives specific to each of the featured artists: José Bedia, Tomás Esson, Yusimy Lara, Jon Pylypchuk, and Alan Sonfist. Here are excerpts; for more information and a video of the exhibition, see MSA X.

For Tomás Esson the Talisman symbolizes not only the relationship with his father, who introduced him to the concept of a “resguardo” or personal protective amulet but also signifies many transformations in his life. It is a symbol modeled from paste and late baked to harden, something the artist traditionally always carries in his pockets. He often gives versions to his family members and to special people he meets, giving away hundreds of talisman sculptures. Esson’s Ode to Talisman is an enlarged bronze version of this “resguardo,” a marker to his artistic legacy.

Jose Bedia’s neo-primitivist style is a unique synthesis of the artistic traditions of tribal cultures in Africa and those crafts indigenous to the Americas. Known for his large-scale paintings, his works frequently depict mythical elements, altars, and other sacramental imagery. Nkuyu Wele Konda Nsese (Trickster Hunting an Antelope) is an installation that plays between the physical and non-physical. The trickster, an immaterial being in many cultures, is presented as a bronze sculpture “catching” an intangible painted antelope made of traditional tukula powder. In the painting are other physical elements that protrude such as arrows, real animal legs, and a rope, a metaphorical umbilical cord between the figure and his alter ego. Using Congo myth, Bedia transforms the metaphysical into solid and tangible while creating a seamless translation of the artist’s oeuvre into bronze. [. . .]

For Tomás Esson the Talisman symbolizes not only the relationship with his father, who introduced him to the concept of a “resguardo” or personal protective amulet but also signifies many transformations in his life. It is a symbol modeled from paste and late baked to harden, something the artist traditionally always carries in his pockets. He often gives versions to his family members and to special people he meets, giving away hundreds of talisman sculptures. Esson’s Ode to Talisman is an enlarged bronze version of this “resguardo,” a marker to his artistic legacy.

Yusimy Lara is a Miami-based artist born in Havana, Cuba. Her artistic practices explore subjects related to natural phenomena, specifically its connection to humanity and all that is living. Using a combination of natural and manmade materials, Lara references synergistic interactions between living organisms and their environment. Often her sculptures reference environmental processes occurring over time, addressing erosion, decomposition, and sedimentation. Her amorphous constructions are commentaries on the way life has transformed our planet and how humanity has shaped the transfiguration of the natural world. [. . .]

See more information and video at https://msa-x-2.msa-x.org/2021/07/06/the-new-age-of-bronze-at-fredric-snitzer-gallery/

Also see https://www.snitzer.com/the-new-age-of-bronze

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