New Issue: JWIL (28: 2)

This latest issue of the Journal of West Indian Literature (JWIL, Vol. 28 No. 2) is an open issue edited by Glyne Griffith. [Cover art features Mark Jason Weston’s “Keeping It Close” (9 x 12 inches, paper collage and watercolor pencil on watercolor paper, 2020).]

Description: The issue features articles by established scholars in the field alongside work by advanced doctoral candidates, part of the newer cohort of Caribbeanist scholars. Although the selected essays are not formally organized around an overarching theme, a certain thematic tendency is nevertheless discernible as one peruses the contributions.

Several of the essays draw upon the philosophical model of the rhizome, a structuring concept associated with the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, as well as that of Édouard Glissant and Paul Gilroy. Additionally, some of the essays engage Glissant’s concept of relation to advance their analyses of Caribbean literary practice. Also evident in a number of the essays and the two interviews in this November 2020 issue is the intellectual interest in cultural and linguistic translation and comparativism. For example, Rajiv Mohabir’s essay on Chutney music examines daru (rum) poetics in Indo-Caribbean Hindi and Bhojpuri cultural productions, and Janet Graham’s analysis of Derek Walcott’s Omeros contemplates the epic’s investment in naming by comparing Glissant’s concept of relationality with the native Hawaiian idea of the storied place. Stephanie McKenzie’s interview of the Aruban-Argentinian writer and visual artist Arturo Desimone includes one of his poems in Papiamento accompanied by his English translation, and Véronique Maisier’s interview of Jamaican poet and fiction writer Alecia McKenzie reveals McKenzie’s commitment to the Caribbean Translation Project which she launched in 2017. These are but a few of the highlights in this full, rich issue of JWIL Vol. 28 No. 2.

For access to full issue, visit https://www.jwilonline.org/downloads/vol-28-no-2-november-2020/

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