Costa Rica: The Tamarindo Labyrinth

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Elizabeth Lang describes the Tamarindo Labyrinth at La Senda farm in Santa Rosa, Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica:

Nature abounds in all colors, sizes and shapes at La Senda farm. “La Senda” means “the path,” or the path in life, as owner Griet Depypere defines it. Here, the term is not only figurative: the farm is home to the renowned Tamarindo Labyrinth, built with approximately 5,000 cacti.

The idea for La Senda, one of the world’s biggest walking labyrinths, first came to Costa Rican homeopathic doctor and dowser Sergio Salas after he found two energy vortexes at the farm.

“He came one day to visit me and went into the forest – this was all forest before – and he found two big circles of energy. This is one of them, and the other one’s over there. He also saw that these energy centers had an opposite charge: a positive and negative one,” Depypere told The Tico Times while walking through the labyrinth.

After establishing the energy points within the labyrinth, Salas told Depypere to wait for the land to tell them what to do rather than imposing things upon it.

That process required some patience.

“After two years he called us saying that he knew what we had to do: a labyrinth. He channeled all the instructions for the design. Since he was not a labyrinth designer, we contacted Ronald Esquivel, a Costa Rican architect specializing in sacred geometry and labyrinth designs,” Depypere recalled. [. . .]

With the design in hand, Depyper built the labyrinth with cacti because of its sacred meaning, traced back to the Mayan and Aztec indigenous peoples. Since the points of energy are vortexes, the cacti work as collectors of energy as well.

“All the cacti’s thorns work as small antennas that capture more energy from the cosmos. There are two types of cacti: the cardon cacti, which is endemic to Costa Rica and represents masculine energy, and this other one, the tuna cacti, which represents feminine energy,” Depyper said. [. . .]

For detailed article, see http://www.ticotimes.net/2018/01/29/how-the-tamarindo-labyrinth-was-created

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