New Book: “The BBC and the Development of Anglophone Caribbean Literature”

Untitled

Our warmest congratulations to Dr. Glyne Griffith, whose new book—The BBC and the Development of Anglophone Caribbean Literature, 1943-1958—was recently published by Palgrave Macmillan’s New Caribbean Studies series.

Description: This book is the first to analyze how BBC radio presented Anglophone Caribbean literature and in turn aided and influenced the shape of imaginative writing in the region. Glyne A. Griffith examines Caribbean Voices broadcasts to the region over a fifteen-year period and reveals that though the program’s funding was colonial in orientation, the content and form were antithetical to the very colonial enterprise that had brought the program into existence. Part literary history and part literary biography, this study fills a gap in the narrative of the region’s literary history.

Glyne A. Griffith is associate professor and chair of the Department of English at the University at Albany-SUNY (in New York). His scholarly work and teaching centers on Anglophone Caribbean literature and literary criticism. He is the author of Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel; co-editor, with Linden Lewis, of Color, Hair and Bone: Race in the Twenty-First Century; and associate editor of the Journal of West Indian Literature (JWIL).

For more information, see http://www.albany.edu/news/75327.php

For purchasing information, see https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9783319321172 and https://www.amazon.com/Development-Anglophone-Caribbean-Literature-1943-1958/dp/331932117X

One thought on “New Book: “The BBC and the Development of Anglophone Caribbean Literature”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s