New Book: Anthony Kellman’s “Tracing Jaja”

jaja93March 2016 saw the publication of Barbadian poet and novelist Anthony Kellman’s Tracing Jaja by Peepal Tree Press. The novel is described as “A richly imaginative and warmly human work of historical fiction.”

Description: Written with subtle psychological insights into a relationship that crosses ages and cultures, and a poet’s perception of the natural beauties of his own island, Tracing Jaja examines the emerging love between an ailing African king in exile and his Barbadian servant Becka.

“King Jaja won’ leh Becka ’lone

King Jaja won’ leh Becka ’lone

Wha’ Becka got, um is all she own.”

Anthony Kellman has created a warmly human work of historical fiction. He locates it between the trace of a satirical folk song, ridiculing the old African king’s affair with his Barbadian servant, and the official records of the illegal kidnapping and exile to the Caribbean of Jubo Jubogha, the King of Opobo, who stood in the way of British imperial interests in the palm-oil rich region of the Niger delta. The novel focuses on the last four months of Jaja’s life and the ironies of his position in Barbados where Whites dominated all aspects of life and race prejudice was nakedly expressed, but where many Black Barbadians were piqued to discover the presence of an African king amongst them.

At the heart of the novel is an entirely human drama in which, though his relationship with young Becka brings new life to his battered body and spirit, and the Barbadian landscape lifts his despair, the king never loses his sense of the injustice done to him or gives up on his urgent desire to return home.

Anthony Kellman writes with subtle psychological insights into a relationship that crosses ages and cultures, and with a poet’s perception of the natural beauties of his own island.

Anthony Kellman was born in Barbados in 1955, educated at Combermere School, at UWI (Cave Hill) and in the U.S. A poet, novelist, and musician, he is the originator of the Barbados poetic form, Tuk Verse, based on the rhythms of Tuk, the island’s indigenous music.

For more information, see http://www.peepaltreepress.com/books/tracing-jaja

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