Guadeloupean writer Gerty Dambury wins the Carbet Prize

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Guadeloupean writer Gerty Dambury has won the coveted Prix Carbet de la Caraïbe et Tout-Monde for her book Le Rêve de William Alexander Brown (Editions du Manguier). She was the jury’s unanimous choice and received her award at the Memorial Acte, the museum devoted to the history of slavery in Pointe-à-Pitre. Our warmest congratulations!

“It’s a great source of pride, the feeling of joining a faily that I admire, that I read, the I endeavor to make known. To be among my own is very important,” she said to Agence France Presse. he book, published in 2015, traces the true story of a native of St Vincent who in 1821 opens the first theater directed by a black man in New York.

“It is based on my research on this man and some thirty others, all black, some of them still half-slaves, who had to evade their owners to act int he theater at night. It was a formidably daring enterprise, since it was what the Americans call an ‘integrated’ theater where blacks and whites worked together,” Dambury said.

The theater director, comedienne, novelist, poet, and winner of the 2008 SACD Prize for francophone theater for her work Trames, had received a special commendation from the Prix Carbet jury for her literary trajectory. Last summer she published her most recent novel, Sérénade a Poinsettia (Editions du Manguier).

The Carbet Prize is awarded by the Institut du Tout-Monde founded by the late Edouard Glissant to recognize “A Caribbean work open to the imagination and our multiplicity of identities.” Previous winners include Patrick Chamoiseau, Dany Laferrière, Maryse Condé, Simone and André Schwarz-Bart, and Lyonel Trouillot.

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