Theater: “Sons of Blighty,” A Play about Racial Hostility

sons_of

“Sons of Blighty,” written by east London playwright Paula David, uses interviews with famous and local people to explore racism and the journey of the black, British male. “Sons of Blighty” opened tonight (November 19) for three shows at the Ye Olde Rose and Crown theatre pub in Walthamstow, East London (UK). The playwright says: “The British Caribbean male story is muffled by negative media stories and has been for decades. It is important to me that their voice is given the space it deserves.”

The play was written by poet, playwright and songwriter Paula David, and was inspired by interviews conducted by poet and screenwriter Benjamin Zephaniah, Apprentice winner Tim Campbell MBE, the first black leader of the British Trade Union Lord Bill Morris and barrister of the Queen’s Bench Courtney Griffiths QC.

Talking to the Waltham Forest Guardian, David said: “Sons of Blighty is stylistically realism based on the observation of real life.

“It’s a story of four British Caribbean men. The story explores their different ways of dealing with the hostility and racism they experience in the place they call home. The solutions they explore fail and succeed in different ways. All lead to an answer, but only one will set them free.”

Explaining her inspiration for Sons of Blighty, she added: “As a playwright I am interested in giving voice to groups within the community that are largely unheard. The British Caribbean male story is muffled by negative media stories and has been for decades. It is important to me that their voice is given the space it deserves.”

For more information, visit: www.yeolderoseandcrowntheatrepub.co.uk/

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