Ebony Patterson and Hew Locke at Prospect.3, New Orleans international art festival

Hew Locke's symbol-laden parade mural made from black Mardi Gras beads
Hew Locke’s symbol-laden parade mural made from black Mardi Gras beads

Prospect.3, New Orleans international art festival is an art festival featuring 58 individual exhibits of works by artists from around the country and world, displayed in 18 museums and other sites in New Orleans. The artists were selected by Franklin Sirmans, the curator of contemporary art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). Prospect.3 also includes several other popup exhibits that were not selected by Sirmans. These scattered exhibits are called P.3+ or satellite exhibits.

When: The exhibits are on view Wednesdays through Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., through Jan. 25, 2015. The exhibit will be closed Nov. 27-28, Dec. 24-25 and Jan. 1, 2015. University venues will have longer holiday hiatuses. 

Admission: Admission to individual venues applies. Adult admission to the Contemporary Arts Center, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art and the New Orleans Museum of Art is $10. Louisiana residents receive free admission to NOMA on Wednesdays, the Ogden on Thursdays and the CAC on Sundays. Visit the Prospect.3 website.

Hew Locke's symbol-laden parade mural made from black Mardi Gras beads 3
Hew Locke’s symbol-laden parade mural made from black Mardi Gras beads 3

Here are some of the works related to the Caribbean.

The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St.

“Basquiat and the Bayou,” on the Ogden’s fifth floor, is a first time ever gathering of artworks inspired by the American south, executed during the brief career of Jean-Michel Basquiat.  Basquiat was a 1980s New York art superstar, whose fame and influence has reached supernova scale since his death in 1988. No American artist is more admired. Read: “Basquiat and the Bayou is the not-to-miss show at Prospect.3.”

Hew Locke's symbol-laden parade mural made from black Mardi Gras beads 2
Hew Locke’s symbol-laden parade mural made from black Mardi Gras beads 2

 The Newcomb Art Gallery

Prospect.3 is an eclectic and sometimes incongruent exhibit. But the four-artist combo, at the Newcomb Art Gallery on the Willow Street side of the Tulane University campus, is an island of aesthetic and thematic harmony.

The collective theme is celebration in all its psychological complexities. Visitors will adore Montana artist Andrea Fraser’s poignant pyramid of cast off Brazilian Carnival costumes surrounded by glinting mirrored geometric sculptures by Iranian artist Monir Farmanfarmaian. British artist Hew Locke’s symbol-laden parade mural made from black Mardi Gras beads lends a dour note to the proceedings. But Jamaican artist Ebony G. Patterson brings back the buoyancy with her ecstatic glitter-coated tapestries, inspired by Caribbean dance clubs.

Ebony G. Patterson's ecstatic glitter-coated tapestries, inspired by Caribbean dance clubs
Ebony G. Patterson’s ecstatic glitter-coated tapestries, inspired by Caribbean dance clubs
Ebony G. Patterson's ecstatic glitter-coated tapestries, inspired by Caribbean dance clubs 3
Ebony G. Patterson’s ecstatic glitter-coated tapestries, inspired by Caribbean dance clubs 3

Contemporary Arts Center, 
900 Camp St. With works by Manal AlDowayan (Saudi Arabia), Firelei Báez, (Dominican Republic), Zarina Bhimji
(Uganda), Douglas Bourgeois (Louisiana), Mohamed Bourouissa (Algeria), Thomas Joshua Cooper (USA), Charles Gaines (USA), Theaster Gates (USA), Pieter Hugo (South Africa), Yun-Fei Ji (China), Remy Jungerman (Suriname), Glenn Kaino (USA), Lucia Koch (Brazil), Sophie T. Lvoff (New Orleans), Pushpamala N. (India) with Clare Arni (Great Britain) and Joe Ray (USA), Analia Saban (Argentina), Lucien Smith (USA), Agus Suwage (Indonesia) and David Zink Yi (Peru).

The Exchange Gallery, Arts Council of New Orleans, 935 Gravier St. With works by Liu Ding (China), Lisa Sigal (USA) and Tavares Strachan (Bahamas).

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