Jean-Ulrick Désert’s “Amour Colère Folie: A Temporary Monument to Resistance”

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Germany-based Haitian artist Jean-Ulrick Désert is on his way to Martinique’s first biennial of contemporary art—Biennale Internationale d’Art Contemporain (BIAC)—to create what promises to be a stunning tribute to Marie Chauvet (one of my favorite Haitian authors). The artist describes the project, providing information on the elements and events that inspired him and related videos (available in the link below). Désert writes:

A new work entitled “Amour Colère Folie: a temporary monument to resistance” – will soon be created with the assistance of artist Hervé Beuze and local art students in Martinique for the BIAC. This will be the first time that an art Biennale will be staged on the island and it will present artworks that in some way are inspired by the renowned poet of resistance Aimé Césaire on the centennial of his birth (www.nytimes.com).

The title of the work is taken from Haitian author Marie Chauvet’s trilogy Amour, Colère et Folie and represents a work of art considered so dangerous that she must enter into exile in New York (like my own family) and whose voice is silenced for decades until this work of literature is published clandestinely against the wishes of her widower and family who feared retribution from the content embedded in her work. This act and statement of resistance has inspired me to amplify the collective acts of resistance. (Find more on Marie Chauvet on Dr.Thomas Spear’s Ile–en–ile www.lehman.cuny.edu/ile.en.ile.)

For the past 6months or so I have been working diligently with some of the organizers for the first Biennale in Martinique that will preview later this month November 2013. Upon much reflection i settled on proposing a public art-work to be installed on a square of Fort de France. The proposed work will be created using various forms of barricading used for crowd and vehicular control. They will be layered concentrically on the square and relatively unremarkable since the elements will all be recognizable. It will be difficult to find some local solutions for the elements i envision, but i will rely much on my local helpers. [. . .]

Jean-Ulrick Désert (Port-au-Prince, Haiti) received his degrees at Cooper Union and Columbia University (New York). The artist currently works in Berlin. Désert’s visual-art spans many mediums and methods. Emerging from a tradition of conceptual-work engaged with social/cultural practices, his artworks vary in forms such as billboards, actions, paintings, site-specific sculptures, video and objects. Known for his “Negerhosen2000” and his provocative “Burqa Project”, Désert often combines cultural iconographies and historical metaphor to disrupt, alter and shift pre-supposed meaning.
He has said his practice may be characterized as visualizing “conspicuous invisibility”.

Désert has exhibited widely at such venues as The Brooklyn Museum, Cité Internationale des Arts, The NGBK in galleries and public venues in Munich, Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Ghent, Brussels. He is the recipient of awards, public commissions, and private philanthropy, including LMCC, Villa Waldberta/Muenchen-kulturreferat and Cité des Arts (France).
Désert represented Haiti and Germany in the 2009 Havana Biennial.

[Many thanks to Thomas Spear for bringing this item to our attention.]

For full description of Amour Colère Folie, see http://jeanulrickdesert.com/content/love-anger-madness-part1; also see https://repeatingislands.com/2013/11/09/martiniques-1st-international-biennial-of-contemporary-art/

For news on the English-language version of Chauvet’s Amour, Colère et Folie, which I first read in its first  translation by my co-blogger, Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert, see https://repeatingislands.com/2009/08/15/marie-chauvet%e2%80%99s-amour-colere-et-folie-in-english/

[You may want to search more on this site under Marie Chauvet, Marie Vieux Chauvet, and Marie Vieux-Chauvet.]

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