Caribbean Royal Ladies in the News

We have a few Caribbean-born girls living in royal circles, and two of them were in the news in the past week, so here’s an update.

Michaëlle Jean, the Haiti-born Governor General of Canada (or Canada’s Vicereine, as she should be styled, since she stands for the Queen in this outpost of her Commonwealth) was at hand earlier this week to welcome British Queen Elizabeth II on her state visit to Canada. Jean, Canada’s 27th Governor General since it joined the Commonwealth, looked very regal herself in the press photographs of the event. Check out the royally de rigueur hat.

The second of our royals in the news was Grand Duchess María Teresa of Luxembourg, wife of the reigning Grand Duke and mother to the heir to the throne.  She was born María Teresa Mestre y Batista-Falla in Havana, Cuba, and met her very grand royal husband when they were both students at the University of Geneva. They married in 1981. Check out the absolutely obscene sparkler on her head in this photo taken last week when the couple attended the wedding of Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden. The thing, which can probably feed the population of Port-au-Prince for the next five years, is the Luxembourg Empire Tiara. I bet she’s not bringing that with her on her next visit home to Havana.

In case you want to be updated on all Caribbean royals (there are only three), the one not to have made any news this week was Her Serene Highness Princess Angela of Liechtenstein, the Panama-born wife of Prince Maximilian of Liechtenstein, second son of the reigning Prince of Liechtenstein and brother to the heir to the throne.

Princess Angela, born in Bocas del Toro, Panama, is the only black woman in a reigning European royal family. She’s a fashion designer and makes few waves—and although a possessor of tiaras (as you can see on her wedding photo), she is seldom seen wearing any obscenities on her head.

OMG, the more I look at that crown thing, the more I think it belongs either in a museum or sold so it can do some people some good. And let’s not talk about the necklace. Nothing like that has ever been seen in the Malecon.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s