Posted by: lisaparavisini | September 11, 2013

National Parks Try to Appeal to Minorities in the USA

ImageThis article by KIRK JOHNSON appeared in The New York Times.

Thrusting out into the Pacific Ocean, Olympic National Park can feel like a lost world, with its ferny rain forests, violent surf and cloud-shrouded peaks.

But to the four women who hiked down to the sand one recent afternoon, there was an added element of strangeness: race.

“We’ve been here for two days, walking around, and I can’t think of any brown person that I’ve seen,” said Carol Cain, 42, a New Jersey resident of Dominican and Puerto Rican roots, who was zipped up tight in her hooded, dripping rain jacket.

The National Park Service knows all too well what Ms. Cain is talking about. In a soul-searching, head-scratching journey of its own, the agency that manages some of the most awe-inspiring public places is scrambling to rethink and redefine itself to the growing number of Americans who do not use the parks in the way that previous — mostly white — generations did.

Only about one in five visitors to a national park site is nonwhite, according to a 2011 University of Wyoming report commissioned by the Park Service, and only about 1 in 10 is Hispanic — a particularly lackluster embrace by the nation’s fastest-growing demographic group.

One way the service has been fighting to break through is with a program called American Latino Expeditions, which invited Ms. Cain and her three colleagues. Groups like theirs went to three parks and recreation areas this summer — participants competed for the spots, with expenses paid for mostly through corporate donations — part of a multipronged effort to turn the Park Service’s demographic battleship around.

“We know that if we get them there, it can be transformative,” Jonathan B. Jarvis, the Park Service’s director, said in a telephone interview. A single positive park visit, he said, can create a lifelong pattern.

Easy to say, harder to achieve, Mr. Jarvis admitted. But the agency, in looking for a path forward, has also stumbled onto an unlikely team of allies — from outdoor outfitters to health and fitness advocates — all focused on the same thing: encouraging, supplying or simply understanding the young minority market.

GirlTrek, a national nonprofit group, organizes fitness-oriented park hikes for African-Americans. REI, the big recreation retailer, and Aramark, which manages lodging in some national parks, are sponsoring expeditions through the American Latino Heritage Fund of the National Park Foundation, a Congressionally chartered nonprofit group. New recruiting efforts to diversify the Park Service’s employee base — also largely white — are working with urban youth who might scoff at the idea of being a ranger in the wild, but could gravitate toward history, science or construction jobs.

New attractions are part of the mix, too. National monuments managed by the Park Service have been created in the past few years to recognize more minority figures in American history, like Cesar Chavez, the farm labor organizer, and Harriet Tubman of Underground Railroad fame.

“The future is diverse,” said Scott Welch, a spokesman for Columbia Sportswear, which provided clothing to expedition groups this summer and has been working with GirlTrek. “If you want to be a brand for the future, you’ve got to embrace that.”

But the effort to diversify also touches some deep cultural grooves in American life that may not be as quick to change as a moisture-wicking outdoor shirt.

Many white Americans who grew up going to the parks had towering figures of outdoor history — not to mention family tradition — blazing the trail as examples. And those examples, like Daniel Boone and the fur trappers of the Old West, tended to be white.

The idea of roughing it in a tent, however, can feel to some people like going backward, said Ms. Cain, a first-generation American who said the stories in her family about escaping the hard rural life still resonate.

Chelle Roberts, 40, who was on the Olympic Park expedition with her sister, Crystal, 33, co-authors of the blog BrownGirlsFly, said there was also simply more of an appetite for vacations in cushy surroundings. “People want a lot of things we associate with modern luxury,” she said.

The Park Service has allied with private interests before, in survival or strategy. At the agency’s founding in 1916, the idea of having national parks at all was new and had to be introduced and sold. Art was a tool then, with majestic landscape works by Albert Bierstadt and other painters widely reproduced in pushing the notion that natural majesty was of value.

In the 1950s and ’60s, the automobile industry became a partner, when the Park Service went after World War II veterans, who were furiously raising baby boom families. Advertising campaigns of the time, like “See the U.S.A. in Your Chevrolet,” linked the call of the open road to the appeal of outdoor adventure.

But the new effort goes further, to the question of how, and how much, the parks themselves must change to attract a fundamentally different audience. Wireless access, for example — still nonexistent in much of the Park Service universe — could divide older park visitors from minorities and young people, the so-called millennial generation, who want to share the experience live in social media with their peers.

“Boomers maybe want to get away, and millennials want to be connected; that changes how you use the space,” said Laura Swapp, REI’s director of diversity and inclusion. Music events could be another potential generational dividing line — peace and quiet versus entertainment — but would also draw the demographic the Park Service is after, Ms. Swapp said.

But the reality that going to a park, at least for now, means encountering mostly white people is its own potential barrier. Research by the Park Service says some members of minority groups have said they fear they would feel unwelcome.

Ms. Cain said she intended to write about that sense of isolation in her blog, GirlGoneTravel. “You’re going to notice it,” she said. “Don’t let it be distracting.”

But Ana Serafin, 29, a Venezuelan-born member of the team who writes the blog Traveling Latina, said she would probably not talk to her readers about it. “It might scare them,” she said.

The natural beauty of Olympic National Park and Second Beach, though, was unquestioned and overwhelming, she and the others said. “Photographer’s heaven,” Ms. Serafin said as she began snapping shots.

Live posts mostly had to wait, though. The park’s Internet connection was too slow.

For the original report go to http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/06/us/national-parks-try-to-appeal-to-minorities.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20130906&_r=0

Posted by: lisaparavisini | September 11, 2013

Diversity, excitement in TTFF Panorama features

t+t

Twenty-six feature films from beyond the Caribbean will screen in the Panorama section of the 2013 T&T Film Festival (TTFF), Trinidad’s Guardian reports.

The Festival, now in its eighth year, takes place from September 17 to October 1, and screens feature-length, short and experimental films from the Caribbean and its diaspora.

The Festival also screens feature-length fiction and documentary films from world cinema in its Panorama section.

A release from the TTFF said this section comprises films from Latin and North America, as well as from T&T’s “heritage” regions, including countries in Africa and Europe, India, and, for the first time, China.

The majority of these are new or recent films which had their world premiere at some of the most prestigious film festivals in the world, including Cannes, Toronto, Sundance and Berlin. The announcement of the 26 Panorama films brings the number of features screening at this years Film Festival to 49. The total number of films screening at the Festival, including short films and experimental film and video works in the New Media section, is 151.

“The TTFF will present a programme of world cinema, alongside our Caribbean selection of films, in order to offer our audiences the opportunity to see films primarily from the global south that will enlighten and entertain,” said Emilie Upczak, Creative Director, TTFF.

“And we are pleased to be able, with the support of our partner diplomatic missions, to host a group of filmmakers and talent from selected Panorama section films to be present to engage with our audiences.”

No

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Pablo Larraín

Region: Chile

Year: 2012

Running Time: 118 mins

Language: English Subtitles, Spanish

Rating: PG-13

Screening Times:
Sept 20, 8 pm, Little Carib Theatre
Sept 23, 8.30 pm, MovieTowne POS

Papilio Buddha

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Jayan Cherian

Region: India

Year: 2012

Running Time: 108 mins

Language: English, English subtitles, Malayalam

Rating: 16+

Screening times:
Sept 19, 5.30 pm, Little Carib Theatre
Sept 25, 8 pm, Little Carib Theatre

Pirogue, The

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Moussa Touré

Region: Senegal

Year: 2012

Running Time: 87 mins

Language: English Subtitles, French and Spanish, Wolof

Rating: PG-13

Screening Times”
Sept 24, 6 pm, MovieTowne POS
Sept 29, 8 pm, Little Carib Theatre

Portrait of Jason

Type: Documentary Feature

Director: Shirley Clarke

Region: USA

Year: 1967

Running Time: 105 mins

Language: English

Showing At: Studio Film Club

Rock, Paper, Scissors

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Hernán Jabes

Region: Venezuela

Year: 2012

Running Time: 111 mins

Language: English Subtitles, Spanish

Rating: 18+

Screening Times:
Sept 19, 8 pm, Little Carib Theatre
Sept 28, 11 pm, MovieTowne POS

Senoritas

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Lina Rodríguez

Region: Colombia

Year: 2013

Running Time: 87 mins

Language: English Subtitles, Spanish

Rating: 18+

Screening times:
Sept 23, 5.30 pm, Little Carib Theatre
Sept 26, 5.30 pm, Little Carib Theatre Q&A

Anina

Type: Animated, Narrative Feature

Director: Alfredo Soderguit

Region: Colombia

Year: 2013

Running Time: 80 mins

Language: English Subtitles, Spanish

Rating: GA

Screening times:
Sept 18, 11 am, MovieTowne POS
Sept 24, 11 am, MovieTowne POS
Sept 28, 11 am, MovieTowne POS

Born to Hate… Destined to Love

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Habib Faisal

Region: India

Year: 2012

Running Time: 120 mins

Language: English subtitles, Hindi

Rating: 16+

Screening Times:
Sept 21, 8.30 pm, MovieTowne POS
Oct 1, 8.30 pm, MovieTowne POS

Candid

Type: Narrative Feature
Director: Vishnu Seesahai
Region: Trinidad + Tobago, USA
Year: 2012
Running Time: 92 mins
Language: English
Rating: 18+

Screening Times
Sept 21, 11 pm, MovieTowne POS
Sept 26, 8 pm, Little Carib Theatre, Q&A

Dream of Lu, The

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Carlos Sama
Region: Mexico
Year: 2011
Running Time: 106 mins
Language: English Subtitles, Spanish
Rating: GA

Screening Times
Sept 18, 8.30 pm, MovieTowne PoS
Sept 28, 5.30 pm, Little Carib Theatre, Q&A

Free Angela and All Political Prisoners

Type: Documentary Feature

Director: Shola Lynch

Region: USA

Year: 2012

Running Time: 102 mins

Language: English
Rating: GA

Screening Times:
Sept 22, 6 pm, MovieTowne POS
Sept 27, 8.30 pm, MovieTowne PoS, Q&A
Sept 28, 8 pm, MovieTowne Tobago, Q&A
Oct 1, 8 pm, MovieTowne Tobago

Gloria

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Sebastián Lelio

Region: Chile

Year: 2013

Running Time: 110 mins

Language: English Subtitles, Spanish

Rating: 16+

Screening times:
Sept 19, 8.30 pm, MovieTowne PoS
Sept 28, 8.30 pm, MovieTowne PoS

Handsworth Songs

Type: Documentary Feature

Director: John Akomfrah

Region: United Kingdom

Year: 1986

Running Time: 61 mins

Language: English

Rating: GA

Screening times:
Sept 23, 3.30 pm, MovieTowne PoS
Sept 30, 11.45 am, UWI

The Kid Who Lies

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Marité Ugás

Region: Venezuela

Year: 2011

Running Time: 100 mins

Language: English Subtitles, Spanish

Screening Times
Rating: GA

Screening Times:
Sept 23, 11 am, MovieTowne PoS
Sept 24, 11.45 am, UWI
Sept 27, 11 am, MovieTowne PoS

The Last Summer of La Boyita

Type: Narrative Feature

Director: Julia Solomonoff
Region: Argentina
Year: 2009
Running Time: 93 mins
Language: English Subtitles, Spanish
Rating: PG-13

Screening Times
Sept 24, 8.30 pm, MovieTowne PoS, Q&A
Sept 30, 6 pm, MovieTowne PoS

Middle of Nowhere
Type: Narrative Feature
Director: Ava DuVernay
Region: USA
Year: 2012
Running Time: 97 mins
Language: English
Rating: PG-13

Screening Times
Sept 20, 6 pm, MovieTowne PoS
Sept 29, 3.30 pm, MovieTowne PoS

Neighbouring Sounds
Type: Narrative Feature
Director: Kleber Mendonça Filho
Region: Brazil
Year: 2012
Running Time: 131 mins
Language: English, English Subtitles, Mandarin, Portuguese
Rating: 16+

Screening Times
Sept 18, 8 pm, Little Carib Theatre
Sept 23, 8 pm, Little Carib Theatre

For the original report go to http://guardian.co.tt/entertainment/2013-09-09/diversity-excitement-ttff%E2%80%88panorama-features

books

As part of its Conferencias Caribeñas 13 lecture series, the Institute of Caribbean Studies of the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras (UPR-RP), invites the academic community and the general public to the lecture “El diario de Edward Bliss Emerson en St. Croix y Puerto Rico: Salud, comercio y discursos hegemónicos y subalternos transnacionales, 1831-1834” [The Journal of Edward Bliss Emerson in St. Croix and Puerto Rico: Health, Commerce, Hegemonic Discourses and Transnational Subalterns, 1831-1834] by Dr. José G. Rigau Pérez (UPR-Medical Sciences), Dr. Silvia E. Rabionet (UPR- Medical Sciences), Dr. Annette B. Ramírez de Arella­no (UPR- Medical Sciences), Lic. Wilfredo A. Géigel (University of the Virgin Islands-St. Croix), Dr. Alma Simounet (UPR-RP), and Dr. Raúl Mayo Santana (UPR- Medical Sciences).

This activity will take place on Thursday, September 12, 2013, from 1:00 to 3:30pm in Amphitheatre Manuel Maldonado Denis (CRA 108) of the Carmen Rivera de Alvarado (CRA) Building, School of Social Sciences, UPR-RP.

Lecturers and Topics are:

Dr. José G. Rigau Pérez—“El diario transnacional de Edward Bliss Emerson: St. Croix, Puerto Rico y Nueva Inglaterra, 1831-1834”

Dr. Silvia E. Rabionet—“Una estrella entre tantas: Apuntes biográficos de Edward B. Emerson”

Dra. Annette B. Ramírez De Arellano—“Ideología y etiología en el tratamiento de la Tisis: El caso de Edward B. Emerson”

Lic. Wilfredo A. Géigel—“Edward B. Emerson: El turista médico del Siglo XIX”

Dra. Alma Simounet—“Lo bueno, lo malo y lo peor: La construcción del “otro” en el diario caribeño de E. B. Emerson de 1831-1832”

Dr. Raúl Mayo Santana—“Los silencios trágicos de Edward Bliss Emerson ante el abismo de la Tuberculosis”

This lecture will be broadcast LIVE online through the following website: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/cc71

Comments and suggestions on this presentation will be welcome at: iec@uprrp.edu

For further information, you may call Dr. Humberto García Muñiz, Director, at (787) 764-0000, extension 4212, or write to iec@uprrp.edu

Also see the Institute of Caribbean Studies on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#%21/pages/Instituto-de-Estudios-del-Caribe-UPR/146169468754542?ref=sgm

Posted by: ivetteromero | September 11, 2013

Soledad O’Brien Interviews Former Haitian dictator ‘Baby Doc’

duvalier.pt_465_low_1378428378431

Al Jazeera recently posted an interview by special correspondent Soledad O’Brien with former Haitian dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier. Known as “Baby Doc,” Duvalier took over as Haiti’s dictator at age 19 when his father “Papa Doc” died. The family dynasty, known for brutality and corruption, lasted for three decades and ended when “Baby Doc” was overthrown in 1986 and went into exile in France. Duvalier returned to Haiti in 2011, a year after a devastating earthquake struck, saying he wanted to help the country. In the photo above, he meets Soledad O’Brien (for America Tonight) at a restaurant in Port-au-Prince with his lawyer by his side.

As the article points out, Haiti is still struggling to recover from the effects of its catastrophic 2010 earthquake, but it is also grappling with the presence of Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier, a former dictator who returned from exile in 2011.

In August, Soledad O’Brien caught up with the elusive former president, who faces corruption charges and is trying to access about $6 million frozen in a Swiss bank account. She also spoke with Robert Duval, who was a political prisoner during Duvalier’s rule.

For more photos from O’Brien’s latest reporting trip to Haiti, see http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/america-tonight-blog/2013/8/13/behind-the-sceneswithamericatonightinhaiti.html

For interview and article, see http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/america-tonight-blog/2013/9/4/exclusive-soledadobrienmeetsexdictatorbabydocduvaliervictim.html

RovingTree-545x800Claire-1of-the-Sea-LightHaiti Cultural Exchange and the Brooklyn Book Festival extend an invitation for a special Bookend Event leading up to the official Brooklyn Book Festival. The event includes readings by noted Haitian educator, choreographer, and author Elsie Augustave from her new novel The Roving Tree. Special guest Edwidge Danticat will discuss aspects of her career and her newest novel, Claire of the Sea Light.

The readings take place on Saturday, September 21, 2013, from 3:00 to 6:00pm at FiveMyles Gallery, located at 558 St John’s Place in Brooklyn, New York.

Admission is free but seating is limited; please RSVP to RSVP@haiticulturalx.org

For more information: http://haiticulturalx.org/program-02

Posted by: ivetteromero | September 11, 2013

Oscar de la Renta Demands Respect for Fashion Week

Oscar-de-la-Renta-1

Columnist Liz Smith features fashion great Oscar de la Renta—originally from the Dominican Republic and now recognized as a North American fashion icon—focusing on the designer’s critique of Fashion Week; he calls for going back to highlighting high fashion rather than letting it become a circus spectacle of celebrities and attention grabbing would-be stars. Smith writes:

Who is numero uno in real fashion influence and knowledge? No, not Anna Wintour of Vogue and now in all but total control of Conde Nast. Not to say she isn’t right there at the tippy-top. But I believe even Anna would agree with me when I name – the one and only Oscar de la Renta. This smart and charming and talented, sometimes outrageous Dominican who graduated from Elizabeth Arden in his early days, has, in his professional lifetime , been wed to two women just as smart, cultured, and highly thought of (the late Francoise and the current Annette) as he is. And, at 81, Oscar has overcome all obstacles, gone fashionable world-wide and he really “gets it.”

He is both available and knows when to be unavailable. He takes on modern technology, using techno-savvy, and weds it to historical real knowledge and fashion grandeur. He has made himself into a North American icon, with all the attachments of international recognition.

When he notes to Mail Online’s Sadie Whitelocks that Fashion Week in New York has “become a circus.” He knows whereof he speaks – slamming celebrities and their mindless hordes of followers as ruining what should be a specialty. He demands that high fashion deserves respect. It should be regarded with less spectacle and more substance.

Oscar realizes it is in fashion’s nature to always change. But the current poseurs, wannabes, multitudes of photographers and crowds having nothing to do with actual fashion are ruining a true world of selectivity and knowledge that does have something to say. He blames the stars and aspiring stars and their hangers on, who ruin occasions like the Academy Awards. I think he is saying that certain kinds of celebrity are partly to blame for the current mediocrity.

[. . .] I guess something has to change before Fashion Week implodes in on itself. A world of screaming photographers, getting the goods, isn’t good for running the show on the runway and this includes clamoring crowds shouting people’s names and making a public nuisance of themselves. Fashion Week has become somewhat chaotic. Gangs photographing and attacking celebrities and over-eager would-be stars, are overshadowing and overwhelming Fashion Week itself. [. . .]

For full article, see http://www.huffingtonpost.com/liz-smith/oscar-de-la-renta-demands_1_b_3880413.html

Posted by: ivetteromero | September 11, 2013

Bocas Lit Fest at the Brooklyn Book Festival

Mocada_Event1

Nicholas Laughlin informs us that the Bocas Lit Fest, Trinidad and Tobago’s annual literary festival, will be participating in the Brooklyn Book Festival this year. The festival bookend events take place September 16-22, 2013. The Bocas Lit Fest will team up with Akashic Books and the Caribbean Cultural Theatre to present a showcase of contemporary Caribbean fiction on Thursday, September 19 from 6:00 to 8:00pm, at MoCADA, 80 Hanson Place, in Brooklyn, New York.

Featuring seven writers—Robert Antoni, Elsie Augustave, Ifeona Fulani, Barbara Jenkins, Oonya Kempadoo, Montague Kobbé, and Diana McCaulay—the event is free and open to the public.

Posted by: ivetteromero | September 10, 2013

Exhibition and Artist Talk: Nathan Budoff’s “Retrato”

nathanOn September 11, 2013, from 6:00-10:00pm, there will be an opening reception and discussion of Nathan Budoff’s new installation, “Retrato” [Portrait]. Recinto Cerra, located at 619 1/2 Cerra Street, between Ponce de León and Fernández Juncos avenues in Santurce, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

“Retrato,” which combines painting and drawing, opened to the public at Recinto Cerra on Thursday, August 22, at 7:00pm, and is on view until September 14. Budoff, a renowned U.S. artist based in Puerto Rico for the past 18 years, presents a new and innovative work, integrating the physical space of the gallery with works made on canvas. “There is something very special about the installation and the way in which it recreates the interior of a residence, illuminated by the individual portraits that appear. They speak to us about the idea of ​​how we live in our spaces, not only with ‘objects,’ but also with people and animals. The portrait is an exercise in preserving fragments, but similarly, a way to understand history, so here it works equally as a mode of examining what is outside our area of focus.”

Nathan Budoff, who completed his art studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is presently is a professor at the University of Puerto Rico, has been the recipient of many grants and honors, including a Fulbright Fellowship. Budoff has exhibited his work in many galleries and institutions on island and abroad. His work is included in the collections of the Ponce Museum of Art, the Museum of Art of Puerto Rico, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, among others.

For more information, see the following article (in Spanish): http://www.elnuevodia.com/esaefimeracotidianidad-1592176.html

Also see https://www.facebook.com/LosContrafuertes

Posted by: ivetteromero | September 10, 2013

Jamaica’s “Ganja Tours” Draw Tourists

Jamaica's cannabis tours

An Associated Press article reports that, although Jamaica is mainly a conservative country, cannabis connoisseurs are now able “to enjoy trips to hidden plantations and sample strains of the drug that inspired Bob Marley.”

California’s Napa and Sonoma have their wine tours, and travellers flock to Scotland to sample the fine single malt whiskies. But in Jamaica, farmers are offering a different kind of trip for a different type of connoisseur. Call them ganja tours: smoky, mystical – and technically illegal – journeys to some of the island’s hidden cannabis plantations, where pot tourists can sample such strains as “purple kush” and “pineapple skunk”.

The tours pass through places such as Nine Mile, the tiny hometown of reggae legend, and famous pot-lover, Bob Marley. Here, in Jamaica’s verdant central mountains, dreadlocked men escort curious visitors to a farm where deep-green marijuana plants grow. Similar tours are offered just outside the western resort of Negril, where a marijuana mystique has drawn weed-smoking holidaymakers for decades. “This one here is the original sinsemilla, Bob Marley’s favourite. And this one here is the chocolate skunk. It’s special for the ladies,” a pot farmer nicknamed “Breezy” told a reporter as he showed off several varieties on his plot one recent morning.

Jamaica's ganja tours

While US legalisation drives have scored major victories in recent months in places like Colorado and Washington state, and the government of Uruguay is moving toward getting into the pot business itself, the plant is still illegal in Jamaica. Some would like to see that change, with advocates saying that marijuana could help Jamaica boost its struggling economy. Justice minister Mark Golding told the Associated Press the government was aware of legalisation efforts elsewhere, and called the issue “dynamic and evolving quickly”. [. . .] The Ganja Law Reform Coalition, an island group calling for the government to decriminalise and regulate pot, is preparing to host an international conference in the capital, Kingston, this month – where topics will include prospects for commercialising cannabis.

Despite its laid-back image, Jamaica is mainly a conservative, religious place and many people bristle at the country’s Rasta reputation. Marijuana has been pervasive but prohibited on the island since 1913. The illicit marijuana crop has declined since the 1970s due to global competition and the US-led war on drugs.

[. . .] In Nine Mile, Breezy says Americans, Germans and increasingly Russians have visited his small farm and sampled his crop. There were no takers for the $50 (£32) tour this morning among a couple of busloads of cruise-ship tourists arriving at Bob Marley’s childhood home, though more than a dozen lined up enthusiastically to buy bags of weed from Breezy’s friends, sold through a hole in the wall of the museum compound. [. . .]

[Photos by David McFadden.]

For full article, see http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/09/jamaica-ganja-tours-draw-tourists

Posted by: ivetteromero | September 10, 2013

Call for Submissions: Moko Magazine

mokoIMG_0036

David Knight Jr.—a writer from St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands and contributor to ARC Magazine and The Caribbean Writer—has sent out a call for works for Moko magazine. Moko is described as a non-profit online magazine that focuses on promoting fiction, poetry, visual arts, and criticism that reflect a Caribbean heritage or experience. Knight explains that the publication is interested in “creating networks with a Pan-Caribbean ethos in a way that is also sensitive to our location within the Virgin Islands” while embracing diversity of experience and self-expression.

Description: Moko seeks submissions from both established and emerging writers, artists, and scholars, and encourages questioning of our societies and ourselves without fear of censorship. If you are a creator, we encourage you to contact one of our editors or submit your work via our website: www.mokomagazine.org.

We publish short stories, poems, interviews, essays, reviews of books, art, photography, and other types of visual media. Any academic articles requiring extensive bibliographic references should be submitted to other journals. Our goal is to publish the best possible work while encouraging Caribbean creators to continue developing their craft.

At this time, we do not accept any hard copy submissions. All submissions should include a brief biography along with your contact information emailed to submissions@mokomagazine.org. Please follow the guidelines for your respective discipline closely. We do not accept any previously published work and we can only entertain one submission per discipline at a time. Please allow at least 90 days for a response.

All writing for Moko should be double-spaced with one-inch margins in a Word (.doc) file. For poetry, submit 3-5 poems in a single document. For all other writing you may submit up to 3,000 words. We accept simultaneous submissions, but if your work is accepted elsewhere please let us know as soon as possible.

All images for Moko should be submitted in jpg format. You may submit 4-5 jpgs no wider than 480 pixels for portrait and no taller than 480 pixels for landscape. Each image should be under 100kb and should be accompanied by a brief description in the cover page. Larger file sizes will be requested once images are accepted for publication. The same guidelines apply for photography submissions as well as photography of art submissions. Videos should be first uploaded to Vimeo or Youtube and proof of authorship must be included in the cover letter.

For original post (in ARC magazine), see http://arcthemagazine.com/arc/2013/09/moko-magazine-call-for-works/

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,427 other followers

%d bloggers like this: