Posted by: ivetteromero | October 3, 2012

Art Exhibition/Film: “Soto Unearthed”

BOSI Contemporary is pleased to announce “Soto Unearthed: A 1968 Film and Selected Early Works,” an exhibition by Venezuelan kinetic artist, Jesús Rafael Soto. The exhibition opens (with a screening of a rare film on the artist) on October 19, 2012 60:00– 9:00pm and continues until December 2, 2012, at BOSI Contemporary, located at 48 Orchard Street, New York, New York. A press preview will also take place on Thursday, October 18, 2012 11AM and the gallery will host a panel discussion on November 10, 2012, at 4:00pm.

Description: In 2009, Sandro Bosi and his gallery director, Ilaria Caravaglio were in Italy researching the provenance of a Soto work titled “Murale Panoramico Sonoro”. Through the process of trying to authenticate the artwork, Bosi and Caravaglio discovered a film entitled Soto in the Italian film archive, Cineteca Nazionale, which was produced for a 1968 Soto exhibition at the Marlborough Gallery in Rome, Italy. This film, to be exhibited side by side with selected works, is an exciting and rare example of the artist interacting with “Murale Panoramico Sonoro”, The Hirshhorn collection’s “Two Volumes in the Virtual” and other pieces, particularly exploring the intersection of his sculpture’s sound capabilities with music. In the film, Soto is seen “playing” his works along with contextualizing key elements of sound, viewer participation, and movement associated with his work.

The exhibition also includes five other select works created between 1968-1971 that have not been on public display for over 40 years and that are definitive examples of the artist’s connection to sound, space, music and movement—four sculptures and one wall painting from varying series’ of Jesús Rafael Soto’s practice. The works chosen for this exhibition will include examples of Progressione (“progression”), Estencion (“extension”), Penetrable (“penetrable”), Murale (“mural”), as well as an abstract kinetic painting. Each of these sculpture-types explores ways that the material world interacts with and is influenced by both human perception and immaterial properties such as movement, sound, light, and gravity. [. . .] The gallery will publish an exhibition catalog titled “Soto Unearthed.”

Jesús Rafael Soto (Ciudad Bolívar, June 5, 1923—Paris, January 14, 2005) was a prolific Venezuelan sculptor. Soto moved to Paris in 1950 and became part of the artist group Zero, alongside Yves Klein and Lucio Fontana, participating in a dialogue of artists working non-figuratively and without gallery representation. Along with many of his contemporaries, Soto was featured in the controversial Kinetic and Op Art exhibition, “The Responsive Eye” curated by William C. Seitz at MoMA in 1965.

Borrowing from mathematical structures and serial music, Soto developed his concept of abstract art as pure transformation of matter and light. Soto used the laws of repetition, progression, and infinite variations to formulate systems within abstract contemporary art. By manipulating both color and line, and developing a relationship between depth and volume, Soto was able to create a unique optical effect. From this conceptual basis, Soto established himself as a revolutionary in the field of kinetic sculpture, designing a series of large-scale interactive sculptures that set the trajectory of his career.

For media, you may contact Lainya Magana at (415) 577-1275or by email at lainya@aopublic.com

Work above: Progressione Bianca E Gialla, 1968


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